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25th August 2018 The Hindu Editorial Analysis under 10 mins series
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Gadgil report and Kasturirangan panel on Western Ghats and its effect on current Monsoon crisis; The alerting numbers of professional graduates applying for government jobs

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  1. 25th Aug 2018 THE HINDU Editorial Analysis ha ii


  2. Trouble in the hills: on Western Ghats ecology . Seven years ago, the Western Ghats Ecology Expert Panel issued raqile western recommendations for the preservation of the f peninsular feqion.Madhav Gadg, who chaired the Union Environment Ministry's WGEEP, has said the recent havocin Kerala is a consequence of short-sighted policymaking, an warned that Goa may also be in the line of nature's fury . The State governments that are mainly responsible for the Western Ghats-Kerala, Karnataka, Tamil Nadu, Goa and Maharashtra must go back to the drawing table with the.... oodo o


  3. ....task before them is to initiate correctives to environmental policy decisions . The issue of allowing extractive industries such as quarrying and mining to way out could be to create the operate is arguably the most contentious. A regulatory framework that was proposed by the Gadgil panel, in the form of an apex Western Ghats Ecology Authority and the State-level units, under the Environment (Protection) Act, and to adopt the zoning system that it proposed. This can keep incempatible activities out of the Ecologically Sensitive Zones (ES7 At issue in the Western Ghats-s spread over 1,29,037 sq km according to the WGEEP estimate and 1,64,280 sq km as per the Kasturirangan panel is the calculation of what constitutes the sensitive core and what activities can be carried out there. The entire system is globally acknowledged as a.


  4. ....biodiversity hotspot. But population estimates for the sensitive zones vary greatly, based on interpretations of the ESZs In Kerala, for instance, one expert assessment says 39 lakh households are drops sharply to four in the ESZs outlined by the WGEEP but the figure lakh households for a smaller area of zones identified b the Kasturirangan panel. The goal has to be sustainable development for the Ghats as a whole The role of big hydroelectric dans, built during an era of rising power demand and deficits, must now be considered afresh and proposals for new ones dropped, Other low-impact forms of green energy led by solar power are available The role of big hydroelectric dams, built during an era of rising power


  5. ...biodiversity hotspot. But population estimates for the sensitive zones vary greatly, based on interpretations of the ESZs In Kerala, for instance, one expert assessment says 39 lakh households are in the ESZs outlined by the WGEEP but the fig lakh households for a smaller area of z panel. The goal has to be sustainable development for the Ghats as a whole ure d rops sharply to four ones identified by the Kasturirangan The role of big hydroelectric dans, built during an era of rising power demand and deficits, must now be considered afresh and proposals for new ones dropped. Other low-impact forms of green energy led by solar power are available . A moratorium on quarrying and mining in the identified sensitive zones, in


  6. ....Kerala and also other States, is necessary to assess their environmental impact. Kerala's Finance Minister, Thomas Isaac, has acknowledged the need to review decisions affecting the environment, in the wake of the floods. Public consultation on the expert reports that includes people's representatives will find greater resonance now and help charta sustainable path ahead


  7. The world's biggest exam From August 9 till August 31, every three days or so, 4.8 lakh candidates, in three shifts of 1.6 lakh each, have been turning up or will turn up at 439 examination centres in 166 cities across the country to give an online test for a potential job as a technician or engine driver (called loco pilots now) in the Railways. In all, about 47.5 lakh candidates are applying for some 60,000 jobs, making it the largest recruitment exercise in the world The sheer number of job-seekers in this category, which is least attractive to educated Indians as it involves physical labour, is itself staggering. But what is more astonishing is the kind of people who are looking for these jobs. For the Assistant Loco Pilot job, lakhs of diploma and degree holders in engineering have applied


  8. And for the khalasi job, reports indicate that over 2.5 lakh engineers, lakhs of graduate and postgraduate degree holders, and even those with tertiary degrees have applied. (The Railways haven't released official figures for this yet.) Jobs that are considered secure (permanent government or bank jobs that provide pension) attract staggeringly disproportionate numbers of job- seekers in India. While the Railways have jumped to the top of the league table, others haven't been far behind o In May, for instance, over ten lakh aspirants applied for 2,000 vacancies of probationary officers in the State Bank of India. Over 7.5 lakh applications were received for about 13,000 police constable jobs in the Rajasthan Police. This number would have been undoubtedly higher if domicile restrictions had not applied


  9. The perception is that getting a government job might be a problem, but once past the post, one can relax till retirement. This is why you have engineers and MBA holders seeking jobs as clerks and constables . In a 2017 study by the Centre for the Study of Developing Societies and the Konrad Adenauer Stiftung, 65% of the youth surveyed said their first preference was for a government job; only 7% said they wanted a private sector job. Seventy-three per cent ranked jobs as the issue they were most worried about . In India, many acquire an education, particularly higher education, not because they are particularly interested in history or politics or economics or engineering, but because they want, they need, a job. They acquire this degree in the face of considerable competition and often at considerable cost. And by and large it is a wasted investment