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Module 11 | Session 1 | I think therefore I am.
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In this session we go through a passage from the works of John Dewey.

Anupam Mishra is teaching live on Unacademy Plus

Anupam Mishra
Batch of 2018 IIM Lucknow || Former Verbal & Quant Faculty || Loves Philosophy || Trekker || Enfield enthusiast || Powerlifter

U
Unacademy user
NB
sir Q3 ka option B me ek baar 700083 likha hai or DRS ke time par 700073 likha hai please check that.
M S Mustafaa
8 months ago
Okkk I will check
  1. Reading Comprehension For the CAT The Genre Series Module 11 Session 1 " think therefore I am" A Course By: Anupam Mishra


  2. Structure & flow of Sessions. Reading the Passage Para-wise Summary Central Idea Word- meanings No specific Questions to be solved (Shall have a separate course for that)


  3. Some Quips about the Passage O Passage part of: 'How We Think' O Was an American Psychologist, Philosopher and Educational and Social Reformer. O Known as one of the fathers of Functional Psychology. O His writings involve variety of subjects like Education, Metaphysics. Logic, Art, Ethics, Social Theory Pragmatism, etc. O Was a profound believer of Democracy. O "The good man is the man who, no matter how Author: John Dewey morally unworthy he has been, is moving to become better."


  4. The Passage (part 1) To expatiate upon the importance of thought would be absurd. The traditional definition of man as "the thinking animal" fixes thought as the essential difference between man and the brutes,-surely an important matter. Thought affords the sole method of escape from purely impulsive or purely routine action. A being without capacity for thought is moved only by instincts and appetites, as these are called forth by outward conditions and by the inner state of the organism. A being thus moved is, as it were, pushed from behind.


  5. The Passage (part 2) This is what we mean by the blind nature of brute actions. The agent does not see or foresee the end for which he is acting, nor the results produced by his behaving in one way rather than in another. He does not "know what he is about." Where there is thought, things present act as signs or tokens of things not yet experienced. A thinking being can, accordingly, act on the basis of the absent and the future. Instead of being pushed intoa mode of action by the sheer urgency of forces, whether instincts or habits, of which he is not aware, a reflective agent is drawn (to some extent at least) to action by some remoter object of which he is indirectly aware An animal without thought may go into its hole when rain threatens, because of some immediate stimulus to its organism. A thinking agent will perceive that certain given facts are probable signs of a future rain, and will take steps in the light of this anticipated future. To plant seeds, to cultivate the soil, to harvest grain, are intentional acts, possible only to a being who has learned to subordinate the immediately felt elements of arn experience to those values which these hint at and prophesy


  6. The Passage (part 3) Philosophers have made much of the phrases "book of nature," "language of nature." W is in virtue of the capacity of thought that given things are significant of absent things, and that nature speaks a language which may be interpreted. To a being who thinks, things are records of their past, as fossils tell of the prior history of the earth, and are prophetic of their future, as from the present positions of heavenly bodies remote eclipses are foretold. Shakespeare's "tongues in trees, books in the running brooks," expresses literally enough the power superadded to existences when they appeal to a thinking being. Upon the function of signification depend all foresight, all intelligent planning, deliberation, and calculation.


  7. Para-Summaries Paragraph -1 O The author expounds upon the utmost significance of thought & how it is a fundamental point of difference b/w us & the animals, who basically operate just on impulse, appetites, & instincts. Paragraph 2 O He goes on to differentiate between a being of Thought & a brute. A brute being one who simply reacts to his impulses & surroundings. While a 'thinking being' is one that can act basis of the 'absent or the future


  8. Para-Summaries Paragraph 3 O The author reiterates the same differences via providing few examples. Stipulates how only a thinking being is capable of subordinating the immediately felt elements to those in future. Paragraph 4 O Talks of how philosophers frequently use phrases like language of nature' etc. Though if not for beings of thought this language' shall be as good as non- existent. Mentions other examples & closes with the comment that signification of nature is cause of Thinking beings.


  9. Central Idea of Passage P1: The author expounds upon the utmost significance of thought & how it is a fundamental point of difference b/w us & the animals, who basically operate just on impulse, appetites, & instincts. P2: He goes on to differentiate between a being of Thought & a brute. A brute being one who simply reacts to his impulses & surroundings. While a 'thinking being' is one that can act basis of the 'absent or the future P3: The author reiterates the same differences via providing few examples. P4: Talks of how philosophers frequently use phrases like 'language of nature' etc. Though if not for beings of thought this 'language' shall be as good as non-existent The passage is themed on the significance of Thought, the differences between beings of Thought & beings otherwise and the significance of Thought in contributing to the Language of nature,


  10. Word-meanings (Contextual) O Expatiate O Impulsive O Remoter O Stimulus O Subordinate O Prophesy Elaborate, explain in detail Hasty, done without thinking Distant, not immediate Something that arouses activity Lower in rank or position Predict, tellin advance