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Events and general points (in Hindi)
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Mutually exclusive and exhaustive events, general points about value of Probability and limits of Probability, compliment of an event and solved examples for iit jee maths

Jagat Chaudhary is teaching live on Unacademy Plus

Jagat Chaudhary
Cofounder of Aspiration School 🏫 Qualified IIT-JEE,IIT-JAM. Expert faculty for IIT-JEE Mathematics Courses. Studied in IIT Bhubaneswar.

U
Unacademy user
Ak
sir material science ka course sufficient h gate ke liye
laplace's principle?????????
sir hmko kuch samgh me ni aa rha hai
Kk
sir ans is 1/10?
  1. IIT-JEE (main +Advanced) Probability On


  2. Equally likely Events:


  3. Equally likely Events: Events are said to be equally likely, when No particular event has a preference to occur in relation to other event.


  4. Equally likely Events: Events are said to be equally likely, whe particular event has a preference to occur in relation to othe event. Example: Experiment is Dice is rolled. E1: Getting face 1 then P(E1)-1/6 E2: Getting face 2 then P(E2)-1/6


  5. Equally likely Events: Events are said to be equally likely, when No particular event has a preference to occur in relation to other event. Example: Experiment is Dice is rolled. E1: Getting face 1 then P(E1)-1/6 E2: Getting face 2 then P(E2)-1/6 Then E1 and E2 are equally likely


  6. Equally likely Events: Events are said to be equally likely, when No particular event has a preference to occur in relation to other event. Example: Experiment is Dice is rolled. E1: Getting face 1 then P(E1)-1/6 E2: Getting face 2 then P(E2)-1/6 Then E1 and E2 are equally likely Mutuallv Exclusive Events;


  7. Equally likely Events: Events are said to be equally likely, when No particular event has a preference to occur in relation to other event. Example: Experiment is Dice is rolled. E1: Getting face 1 then P(E1)-1/6 E2: Getting face 2 then P(E2)-1/6 Then E1 and E2 are equally likely Mutually Exclusive Events:Events are said to be mutually excusive, if their Simultaneous occurrence is impossible.


  8. Equally likely Events: Events are said to be equally likely, when No particular event has a preference to occur in relation to other event Example: Experiment is Dice is rolled. E1: Getting face 1 then P(E1)-1/6 E2: Getting face 2 then P(E2)-1/6 Then E1 and E2 are equally likely Mutually Exclusive Events:Events are said to be mutually excusive, if their Simultaneous occurrence is impossible. Example: E,: Throwing a total of 7 when two Different Dice are rolled. E2 : Throwing a total of 11when two Different Dice are rolled.


  9. Example: Experiment is Dice is rolled. E1: Getting face 1 then P(E1)-1/6 E2: Getting face 2 then P(E2)-1/6 Then E1 and E2 are equally likely Mutually Exclusive Events: Events are said to be mutually excusive, i their Simultaneous occurrence is impossible. Example E1: Throwing a total of 7 when two Different Dice are rolled. E2 Throwing a total of 11when two Different Dice are rolled. Yes these are mutually exclusive.


  10. particular event has a preference to occur in relation to other event. Example: Experiment is Dice is rolled. E1: Getting face 1 then P(E1)-1/6 E2: Getting face 2 then P(E2)-1/6 Then E1 and E2 are equally likely Mutually Exclusive Events: Events are said to be mutually excusive, if their Simultaneous occurance is impossible Example E1: Throwing a total of 7 when two Different Dice are rolled. E2 : Throwing a total of 11when two Different Dice are rolled. Yes these are mutually exclusive. A : Getting a doublet B: Sum is 10


  11. Equally likely Events: Events are said to be equally likely, when No particular event has a preference to occur in relation to other event. Example: Experiment is Dice is rolled. E1: Getting face 1 then P(E1)-1/6 E2: Getting face 2 then P(E2)-1/6 Then E1 and E2 are equally likely Mutually Exclusive Events: Events are said to be mutually excusive, if their Simultaneous occurance is impossible. Example:E1: Throwing a total of 7 when two Different Dice are rolled. E2 Throwing a total of 11when two Different Dice are rolled. Yes these are mutually exclusive. A : Getting a doublet B: Sum is 10 This is not mutually exclusive


  12. Mutually exclusive / disjoint/ incompatible events: Two events are said to be mutually exclusive if occurrence of one of them rejects the possibility o occurrence of the other i.e. both cannot occur simultaneously. In the vein diagram the events A and B are mutually exclusive. Mathematically, we write Events A1, A2, , A"n are said to be mutually exclusive events iff AinA=ovi, j e {1, 2, , n} where i # j


  13. Mutually Exhaustive events: Event as a consequence of an experimental perforamance are said to be exhaustive if nothing beyond those listed in the set of Possible outcomes/ Sample space can occur.


  14. General Points:


  15. General Points: 1. Probability of a sure event is 1 Example: Probability of getting either head or tail whena coin is tossed 2. Probability of an impossible event is zero.


  16. General Points: 1. Probability of a sure event is 1 Example: Probability of getting either head or tail when a coin is tossed 2. Probability of an impossible event is zero. Example Probability of getting 6 when a coin is tossed.


  17. General Points: 1. Probability of a sure event is 1 Example: Probability of getting either head or tail when a co tossed 2. Probability of an impossible event is zero Example Probability of getting 6 when a coin is tossed. 3. Consider two events A and B which are mutually exclusive occurrence of both simultaneously is Impossible.


  18. General Points: 1. Probability of a sure event is 1 Example: Probability of getting either head or tail when a co tossed 2. Probability of an impossible event is zero Example Probability of getting 6 when a coin is tossed 3. Consider two events A and B which are mutually exclusive occurrence of both simultaneously is Impossible. Then probability is zero because n(ATB)-O 4. A and B are exhaustive defined on a sample space then


  19. General Points; 1. Probability of a sure event is 1 Example: Probability of getting either head or tail when a co tossed 2. Probability of an impossible event is zero Example Probability of getting 6 when a coin is tossed 3. Consider two events A and B which are mutually exclusive occurrence of both simultaneously is Impossible. Then probability is zero because n(ANB)-O 4. A and B are exhaustive defined on a sample space then P(AUB)-1


  20. Addition theorem of probability:


  21. Addition theorem of probability: If 'A' and 'B' are any two events associated with an experiment, then P(AuB) P(A) P(B) P(AnB) De Morgan's laws : If A & B are two subsets of a universal set U, then


  22. Ques: An old man while dialing a seven digit phone number. After having dialed the first 5 digits, suddenly forgets the last two but he remembered that the last two digits were different. What is the probability that Correct phone number will be dialed


  23. Ques: An old man while dialing a seven digit phone number. After having dialed the first 5 digits, suddenly forgets the last two but he remembered that the last two digits were different. What is the probability that Correct phone number will be dialed Sol: We have to check possibility for last two digits


  24. Ques: An old man while dialing a seven digit phone number. After having dialed the first 5 digits, suddenly forgets the last two but he remembered that the last two digits were different. What is the probability that Correct phone number will be dialed Sol: We have to check possibility for last two digits total possible outcomes or Sample space have n(S)-10x9-90


  25. Ques: An old man while dialing a seven digit phone number. After having dialed the first 5 digits, suddenly forgets the last two but he remembered that the last two digits were different. What is the probability that Correct phone number will be dialed Sol: We have to check possibility for last two digits total possible outcomes or Sample space have n(S)-10x9-90 Correct outcomes n(A)-1 hence P(A)- n(S)


  26. Ques: An old man while dialing a seven digit phone number. After having dialed the first 5 digits, suddenly forgets the last two but he remembered that the last two digits were different. What is the probability that Correct phone number will be dialed. Sol: We have to check possibility for last two digits total possible outcomes or Sample space have n(S)-10x9-90 Correct outcomes n(A)-1 hence P(A))1 n(S) 90