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Amit Baghel
UPSC 2018 mains; Doing 'The Hindu Newspaper Analysis' since June,2017. YouTube- Gurukul Prime.

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  1. JULY EDITION DAILY EDITORIAL ANALYSIS OF THE HINDU AND OTHER MAJOR NEWSPAPERS Amit Baghel


  2. ABOUT ME EDUCATOR AT UNACADEMY SINCE JUNE,2017 KNOWLEDGE IS POWER Computer science graduate from JIIT,Noida Work experience of 2+ years irn MNCs Doing The Hindu News Analysis Since June,2017


  3. COURSES 1.(Hindi) July 2018: The Hindu Editorial Analysis 2.(Hindi) July 2018: PIB Analysis


  4. JULY 17,EDITORIAL ANALYSIS OVERDUE CORRECTION: ON REVISITING THE COMPANIES ACT Context o A relook at the overly harsh provisions of the Companies Act must yield action Wh y in news? The Centre has announced the constitution of a committee to revisit several provisions of the Companies Act 2013 that impose stiff penalties and, in some cases, prison terms as well, for directors and key management personnel. . Now, this 10-member committee appointed by the Corporate Affairs Ministry has been tasked with checking if certain offences can be de-criminalised


  5. The panel, which includes top banker Uday Kotak, has been given 30 days to work out whether some of the violations that can attract imprisonment (such as a clerical failure by directors to make adequate disclosures about their interests) may instead be punished with monetary fines. It will also examine if offences punishable with a fine or imprisonment may be re- categorised as 'acts' that attract civil liabilities. e Importantly, the committee has also been asked to suggest the broad contours for an adjudicatory mechanism that allows penalties to be levied for minor violations, perhaps in an automated manner, with minimal discretion available to officials. In fact, some of the provisions in the law are so tough that even a spelling mistake or typographical error could be construed as a fraud and lead to harsh strictures. The government hopes such changes in the regulatory regime would allow trial courts to devote greater attention to serious offences rather than get overloaded with cases as zealous officials blindly pursue prosecutions for even minor violations.