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Because first impression matters

Pooja Purohit
A management kid with little clue of design trying to connect two dots with determination and creativity. Looking forward to impact lives.

Unacademy user
agla live seesion kab hoga aapka aur kis vishay par !!!
Hi Pooja ,your course really helped me to focus on some or the other point of interview .Thank you mam for making this course .
Pooja Purohit
2 years ago
I'm glad I could help. Let me know if there's anything else I can help you with
  1. HOW TO PREPARE FOR THE PERFECT INTERVIEW BE EDGY, BE COMPETITIVE!


  2. Communication Tools


  3. Applications & Resumes Resumes should be brief and to the point (1-2 pages). Both must be ERROR FREE! Make sure all information is accurate and captures what you have done in each job. Document your qualifications. NEVER assume anything. The application DEADLINE date is exactly that. Plan ahead!


  4. 1. Format Your Resume Wisely Generally a resume gets scanned for 25 seconds. Scanning is more difficult if it is hard to read, poorly organized or exceeds two pages Use a logical format and wide margins, clean type and clear headings Selectively apply bold and italic typeface that help guide the reader's eye Use bullets to call attention to important points (i.e. accomplishments)


  5. 2. Identify Accomplishments not Just Job Descriptions Hiring managers, seek candidates that can help them solve a problem or satisfy a need within their company Focus on what you did in the job, NOT what your job was there's a difference Include a one or two top line job description first, then list your accomplishments For each point ask yourself, What was the benefit of having done what I did? Accomplishments should be unique to you, not just a list of what someone else did Avoid using the generic descriptions of the jobs you originally applied for or held


  6. 3. Quantify Your Accomplishments Q: What's the most common resume mistake? A: Making too many general claims and using too much industry jargon that does not market the candidate Include and highlight specific achievements that present a comprehensive picture of your marketability Quantify your achievements to ensure greater confidence in the hiring manager and thereby generate interest percentages, dollars, number of employees, etc Work backwards to quantify your accomplishments.


  7. 4. Cater Your Resume for the Industry Unlike advertising and design professionals who have greater creative license in designing their resume for those fields, the mechanical engineering industry won't be impressed and may be turned off by distinctive resume design Err on the side of being conservative stylistically Your accomplishments, error-free writing, grammatically-correct, clean, crisp type and paper will make the impression for you


  8. 5. Replace your Objective" with a "Career Summary" A Career Summary is designed to give a brief overview of who you are and what you do. Most Objectives sound similar: Seeking a challenging, interesting position in X where I can use my skills of X, Y, and Z to contribute to the bottom line. Not telling at all Grab a hiring manager's attention right from the beginning, remembering you have only 25 few seconds to make a good impression Spend time developing a summary that immediately gets their attention, and accurately and powerfully describes you as a solution to their problems


  9. 6. Network. Network. Network. For unemployed candidates, handing out resumes should be a full-time job. The majority of mid- to senior-level positions are filled through networking, so contact absolutely everyone you know in addition to recruiters who are in a position to hire you or share insights. Networking can include Personal business contacts, people you've worked for or who worked for you Vendors and sales representatives you've dealt with in the past five years People listed in the alumni directory of your alma mater With a solid resume in hand you'll greatly increase your odds of earning a closer look and getting that interview


  10. Tips for Successful Interviewing


  11. 3. Respect those already employed It doesn't matter whether you're interviewing to be an entry-level employee or the next CEO of an organization. Be polite to everyone you meet, including the receptionist. You never know who may be asked, "So, what did you think of this candidate?" 4. Dress like you mean it. Dress in business attire, even if you're interviewing in a business-casual office. Suits for men; suits or dresses for women. Go easy on the aftershave or perfume-better yet, don't wear fragrance at all just in case someone you are about to meet has allergies. Go light on the jewelry-earrings, a watch, and nothing else. No T-shirts, tank tops, or flip flops


  12. Softly Toot Your Own Horn! Exhibit quiet confidence. Organize your thoughts and apply your knowledge, skills and abilities. Think globally! Relate "outside" experiences to demonstrate your qualifications.


  13. Don't act as though you would take any job or are desperate for employment Don't chew gum or smell like smoke Don't take cell phone calls during an interview. If you carry a cell phone, turn it off during the interview


  14. What about Answering Questions? Your points must be CLEAR, RELEVANT AND ADEQUATE: to enable the interviewer to understand what you are trying to say; to determine your strengths for that particular job; and to have sufficient information to make a good decision


  15. Be Prepared for Behavior-based Questions! Describe a time when you were faced with problems or stresses at work that tested your coping skills. What did you do? Give an example of a time when you had to be relatively quick in coming to a decision Give me an example of an important goal you had to set and tell me about your progress in reaching that goal Give me an example of a problem you faced on the job, and tell me how you solved it Tell me about a situation in the past year in which you had to deal with a very upset customer or co-worker